Fairmont State junior becomes American citizen, completes naturalization process

Wednesday, December 19, 2018

As 2018 draws to a close, the year has a special meaning for one Fairmont State student. Junior Yi Ting Lin, officially become an American citizen this past fall, something she said she’s been looking forward to for several years. 

Born in Taipei, Taiwan, she has been in the United States for the majority of her life. Right before she started her college career at Fairmont University, she received her Green Card, which permits lawful permanent residency in the U.S. 

“I’ve been wanting to do this for a while but it just takes so much time. Once you get your Green Card you have to wait five years to take your interview and be approved or not,” she said. “There are so many things that come with it, the character and your part as a citizen, especially after I was enlisted.”

Lin said once she had sworn that oath to defend this nation, she had even more desire to become a citizen because she vowed to protect and defend all American citizens. 

“I’m really proud to be an American citizen now and it feels so good to be able to say that,” she said. “Not that it would happen, but there have been deportations and before I was thinking that if I were to get sent back, I wouldn’t know how to survive because the education system is different and English isn’t my first language but it’s my main language now.” 

She was able to receive a Social Security Card through the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA), but she had to apply for a work visa and purchase a new one every two years. Lin is happy to be a part of the Falcon Family and to now be able to further her education being a citizen. 

“I’m majoring in Political Science with a minor in Spanish. I originally wanted to be a translator, linguist,” she said. “I’ve decided to go into active duty when I graduate because I’m enlisted in the Guard and have been for almost two years.” 

“Fairmont has done well for me. Honestly you don’t have to go to a big Ivy League or out-of-state for your undergrad,” she said.